Tag: Terminal

Setting Up VirtualHosts in XAMPP on Mac

Setup your hosts file first

If you don’t know how to edit your hosts file in mac, please visit my previous post here

Enable VirtualHosts

The first thing you’ll need to do is open the file/Applications/XAMPP/xamppfiles/etc/httpd.conf in your favourite text editor. Look for the following lines:

# Virtual hosts
#Include /Applications/XAMPP/etc/extra/httpd-vhosts.conf

Uncomment the second line by removing the hash (#), so that Apache loads your custom VirtualHosts configuration file:

# Virtual hosts
Include /Applications/XAMPP/etc/extra/httpd-vhosts.conf

Create your VirtualHosts

Open the file /Applications/XAMPP/xamppfiles/etc/extra/httpd-vhosts.conf. Towards the bottom of the file you will see some example VirtualHosts, which you should comment out or delete.

At the bottom of the file, add ‘localhost’ as the default named VirtualHost:

<VirtualHost *:80>
   DocumentRoot /Users/???/Documents/workspace/trunk/htdocs
   ServerName test.myserver.local
  <Directory "/Users/???/Documents/workspace/trunk/htdocs">
     AllowOverride All
  </Directory>
</VirtualHost>

How to Modify your hosts file on MAC

Editing the hosts file

Editing the hosts file in Mac OS X – Leopard, is a pretty easy task, especially if you are familiar with the terminal.

Step 1 – Open the Terminal.app

Either by start typing Terminal on the Spotlight, or by going into Applications -> Utilities -> Terminal.

Step 2 – Open the hosts file

Open the hosts by typing on the Terminal that you have just opened:

$ sudo nano /private/etc/hosts

Type your user password when prompted.

Step 3 – Edit the hosts file

The hosts file contains some comments (lines starting with the # symbol), as well as some default hostname mappings (e.g. 127.0.0.1 – localhost).
Simply append your new mappings underneath the default ones. Or edit one of the default values if you know what you are doing!
You can navigate the file using the arrow keys.

Step 4 – Save the hosts file

When done editing the hosts file, press control-o to save the file.
Press enter on the filename prompt, and control-x to exit the editor.

Step 5 – Flush the DNS cache

On Leopard you can issue a simple Terminal command to flush the DNS cache, and have your host file changes to take immediate effect:

$ dscacheutil -flushcache

You can now test your new mapping on the browser